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Op-ed: Being a bad employer is never a competitive advantage

As job growth slows and the potential for a recession looms, how much longer will employers care about what workers want and need? My answer: There is no labor market in which being a bad employer is a competitive advantage.

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Lack of data makes it tough to measure true scope of teacher shortage

Educators in the report — broadly, people working in education, but not just teachers — were more likely on average to say they had too much to do at work, Addison said. More educators had reported calling in sick due to burnout in the past year. And while educators weren’t leaving the field en masse during the pandemic, Addison said she thought they were more likely to leave this year.

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What makes a business an employer of choice?

The organization Bethia Burke leads, the Fund for Our Economic Future, recently has surveyed thousands of workers and hundreds of employers. And those surveys make it clear, Burke said, that beyond competitive wages, businesses that want to be an employer of choice need to create workplaces with better communication and more flexibility.

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Teacher burnout is real, and it’s leading to a shortage of educators in some areas

The Fund For Our Economic Future has a report looking at what workers are quitting, why they’re leaving, and where they’re going to.

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Why Did 400,000+ Quit Jobs in Region? It’s Complicated, Study Finds

While there are many anecdotal answers, Bethia Burke, president of Fund for Our Economic Future, says her organization went looking for the real reasons here in northeastern Ohio.

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The value of people, the power of place

Paying attention to what workers say matters. Even with concerns about a coming recession, talent shortages persist.

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A new survey asks: Where are the workers and what do they want?

“What we’re seeing in the results is that there is a sizable number of people who have shifted their perspective about what matters, and it is showing up in the choices they are making,” she said.

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Manufacturers Can’t Find Workers. Where’d They Go?

Contributed by Ethan Karp to Forbes Manufacturers are not alone in wondering what has happened to the shrinking base of American workers over the last two

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Where Are the Workers? Project launches website with new data and insights for Northeast Ohio

CLEVELAND, Ohio — Where Are the Workers?, a multiphase project delving into the labor shortage in Northeast Ohio, has created a new website to share its findings.

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Wean Foundation Board of Directors Meets at Amphitheater

Bethia Burke, president of the Cleveland-based Fund for Our Economic Future, was the guest speaker at the meeting. She shared insights from her fund’s “Where are the Workers” analysis.

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The Fund for our Economic Future